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Mapu Kutran

Synopsis

Mapu Kutran is a word that comes from the Mapuche language, one of Chile’s first nations people. It is a disease without known origin that attacks when the human damages nature. This disease starts when the person disrespects the environment: cultural spaces like “menoko” (source of water), “lawen” (natural herbs medicine), or high newen (power, strength). The documentary explores the human contradictions.

Review

4/5
A poignant documentary that shines a light on environmental decline and climate change.
Directed by Roberto Urzua, ‘Mapu Kutran’ is a short documentary film that explores the effects anthropogenic climate change has had on south-central Chile. The film delves into the Mapuche’s (the indigenous people) belief that nature itself will retaliate if the human population destroys natural habitats. Narrated by Roberto Urzua, the documentary highlights market greed, environmental destruction and global warming. A poignant documentary with awe-inspiring aerial cinematography throughout.

The 28-minute film, which is almost entirely crafted by done cinematography, highlights the man-made destruction of Chile’s natural landscapes. Despite the film’s picturesque scenery, the film draws attention to the interchanging landscape – sparked by atmospheric warming, deforestation and agriculture overproduction – which have collectively resulted in a deteriorating environment. The Mapuche people believe that human’s will be penalised, through nature, for their gluttony and waste of natural resources.

MP
Roberto Urzua has created a compelling documentary that quickly draws-in audience concentration. The educational narrative is superbly structured by Urzua, which fits neatly with the astounding cinematography. Felipe Castro’s musical composition plays a pivotal role in aiding the overall tone of sorrow. The documentary is narrated in the Spanish language (with English subtitles throughout). A touching film that shines a light on the severity of environmental decline. Highly recommended.

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Roberto Urzua
Writer(s): Roberto Urzua
Cast: Roberto Urzua
Producer(s):
Director of Photography:
Animation (if applicable):

Specifications

Genre:
Collections:
Country:
Year: 2022
Runtime: 28 min

Recommended

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Roberto Urzua
Writer(s): Roberto Urzua
Cast: Roberto Urzua
Producer(s):
Director of Photography:
Animation (if applicable):

Specifcations

Genre:
Collections:
Country:
Year: 2022
Runtime: 28 min

Recommended

Mapu Kutran

Synopsis

Mapu Kutran is a word that comes from the Mapuche language, one of Chile’s first nations people. It is a disease without known origin that attacks when the human damages nature. This disease starts when the person disrespects the environment: cultural spaces like “menoko” (source of water), “lawen” (natural herbs medicine), or high newen (power, strength). The documentary explores the human contradictions.

Review

A poignant documentary that shines a light on environmental decline and climate change.

4/5
Directed by Roberto Urzua, ‘Mapu Kutran’ is a short documentary film that explores the effects anthropogenic climate change has had on south-central Chile. The film delves into the Mapuche’s (the indigenous people) belief that nature itself will retaliate if the human population destroys natural habitats. Narrated by Roberto Urzua, the documentary highlights market greed, environmental destruction and global warming. A poignant documentary with awe-inspiring aerial cinematography throughout.

The 28-minute film, which is almost entirely crafted by done cinematography, highlights the man-made destruction of Chile’s natural landscapes. Despite the film’s picturesque scenery, the film draws attention to the interchanging landscape – sparked by atmospheric warming, deforestation and agriculture overproduction – which have collectively resulted in a deteriorating environment. The Mapuche people believe that human’s will be penalised, through nature, for their gluttony and waste of natural resources.

MP
Roberto Urzua has created a compelling documentary that quickly draws-in audience concentration. The educational narrative is superbly structured by Urzua, which fits neatly with the astounding cinematography. Felipe Castro’s musical composition plays a pivotal role in aiding the overall tone of sorrow. The documentary is narrated in the Spanish language (with English subtitles throughout). A touching film that shines a light on the severity of environmental decline. Highly recommended.

Recommended