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The Wanderer’s Game

Synopsis

Based on a poem by Keri D. Singleton, the film follows the promiscuous interactions of a male escort.

Review

4/5
An experimental drama that delves into the work of a male escort.
Written and directed by Quay Jones, ‘The Wanderer’s Game’ is an experimental drama film that takes a glimpse into the livelihood of a male escort. The film centres around Mike, portrayed by Michael Tillman, and his three contrasting clients, played by Lily Greenwald, Lori Doubek and Anthony Rai. Based on Keri D. Singleton’s poem of the same name, the film, which is entirely filmed in black and white, follows Mike’s brief sexual encounters – irrespective of age, gender and experience. A finely crafted film that has Singleton’s poem intertwined in narration.

The 7-minute film opens with Mike preparing himself for his first client of the day; Charlie – a young religious woman crippled with anxiety. We are subsequently introduced to his second client, a self-assured woman of maturity. Finally, we meet John – another anxious client with a wife and child. Throughout the rendezvous, the film utilizes symbolic imagery regarding human sexuality as well as the striking poetic verses of Singleton’s poem.

TWG e1667175476909
Quay Jones has created a captivating film with the aim of exposing the nature of male prostitution. The drama’s strength is its desire to showcase the human kindness and respect within the sex work industry – something that is rarely seen within modern cinema. Michael Tillman brings a sense of charm and dignity to the role, without an overstating personality. Despite its taboo subject matter, the narrative is surprisingly endearing to watch. The exchange of temporary happiness and sexual fulfilment for money is unashamedly celebrated and that should be applauded. Cinematography, music, sound and post-production is delivered to a professional standard throughout. Highly recommended.

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Quay Jones
Writer(s): Quay Jones
Cast: Anthony Rai, Lily Greenwald, Lori Doubek, Michael Tillman
Producer(s): Antonio Tanksley, Leonardo Frias
Director of Photography:
Animation (if applicable):

Specifications

Subjects: ,
Collections:
Country:
Language: English
Year: 2020
Runtime: 8 min

Recommended

Cast/Crew

Director(s): Quay Jones
Writer(s): Quay Jones
Cast: Anthony Rai, Lily Greenwald, Lori Doubek, Michael Tillman
Producer(s): Antonio Tanksley, Leonardo Frias
Director of Photography:
Animation (if applicable):

Specifcations

Subjects: ,
Collections:
Country:
Language: English
Year: 2020
Runtime: 8 min

Recommended

The Wanderer’s Game

Synopsis

Based on a poem by Keri D. Singleton, the film follows the promiscuous interactions of a male escort.

Review

An experimental drama that delves into the work of a male escort.

4/5
Written and directed by Quay Jones, ‘The Wanderer’s Game’ is an experimental drama film that takes a glimpse into the livelihood of a male escort. The film centres around Mike, portrayed by Michael Tillman, and his three contrasting clients, played by Lily Greenwald, Lori Doubek and Anthony Rai. Based on Keri D. Singleton’s poem of the same name, the film, which is entirely filmed in black and white, follows Mike’s brief sexual encounters – irrespective of age, gender and experience. A finely crafted film that has Singleton’s poem intertwined in narration.

The 7-minute film opens with Mike preparing himself for his first client of the day; Charlie – a young religious woman crippled with anxiety. We are subsequently introduced to his second client, a self-assured woman of maturity. Finally, we meet John – another anxious client with a wife and child. Throughout the rendezvous, the film utilizes symbolic imagery regarding human sexuality as well as the striking poetic verses of Singleton’s poem.

TWG e1667175476909
Quay Jones has created a captivating film with the aim of exposing the nature of male prostitution. The drama’s strength is its desire to showcase the human kindness and respect within the sex work industry – something that is rarely seen within modern cinema. Michael Tillman brings a sense of charm and dignity to the role, without an overstating personality. Despite its taboo subject matter, the narrative is surprisingly endearing to watch. The exchange of temporary happiness and sexual fulfilment for money is unashamedly celebrated and that should be applauded. Cinematography, music, sound and post-production is delivered to a professional standard throughout. Highly recommended.

Recommended