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Sicily Street

A comedy that ventures into the satirical realm of mafia culture.
2/5

Review

In Daryl Hrdlicka’s comedic creation, two Italian-American women, portrayed by Leah Simmons and Lisa Kutter, take center stage in a parody that navigates mafia culture and gang crime while breaking the fourth wall in a TV show format. Despite its low-budget nature, the film attempts a light-hearted take on a dark subject, showcasing unashamed characters with a mix of ruthlessness and friendliness.

While Simmons and Kutter display reasonable chemistry, the film struggles to maintain engagement. The comical tone, initially promising, feels somewhat drawn out, and the humor fails to sustain its impact. The satirical elements, though present, don’t fully capitalize on the potential for comedic brilliance within the subject matter.

Jeff Lambert’s cinematography falls short of cinematic quality, and while the film has its funny moments, technical aspects like sound could be improved for a more immersive experience. The overall execution, while reflective of the low-budget constraints, leaves the viewer wanting more depth and consistency in the comedic narrative.

In essence, Hrdlicka’s short comedy delivers moments of amusement, yet its potential for a more resonant and sustained comedic impact is hindered by pacing issues and technical limitations.

Brief Synopsis

Two “made” women who belong to a certain “family” decide to try their hand at educational television.
Sicily Street Short Film

Spotlight

No artists for this title have been featured on Spotlight.

Credits

Director(s): Daryl Hrdlicka
Writer(s): Daryl Hrdlicka
Cast: Leah Simmons, Lewis Langle, Lisa Kutter
Producer(s): Daryl Hrdlicka, Doug Gerash
Director of Photography: Jeff Lambert
Animation (if applicable):

Specifications

Genre:
Subjects: ,
Country:
Language:
Year:
Runtime: 8 min

Recommended

Recommended

Sicily Street

A comedy that ventures into the satirical realm of mafia culture.
2/5

Review

In Daryl Hrdlicka’s comedic creation, two Italian-American women, portrayed by Leah Simmons and Lisa Kutter, take center stage in a parody that navigates mafia culture and gang crime while breaking the fourth wall in a TV show format. Despite its low-budget nature, the film attempts a light-hearted take on a dark subject, showcasing unashamed characters with a mix of ruthlessness and friendliness.

While Simmons and Kutter display reasonable chemistry, the film struggles to maintain engagement. The comical tone, initially promising, feels somewhat drawn out, and the humor fails to sustain its impact. The satirical elements, though present, don’t fully capitalize on the potential for comedic brilliance within the subject matter.

Jeff Lambert’s cinematography falls short of cinematic quality, and while the film has its funny moments, technical aspects like sound could be improved for a more immersive experience. The overall execution, while reflective of the low-budget constraints, leaves the viewer wanting more depth and consistency in the comedic narrative.

In essence, Hrdlicka’s short comedy delivers moments of amusement, yet its potential for a more resonant and sustained comedic impact is hindered by pacing issues and technical limitations.

Spotlight

No artists for this title have been featured on Spotlight.

Brief Synopsis

Two “made” women who belong to a certain “family” decide to try their hand at educational television.
Sicily Street Short Film

Credits

Director(s): Daryl Hrdlicka
Writer(s): Daryl Hrdlicka
Cast: Leah Simmons, Lewis Langle, Lisa Kutter
Producer(s): Daryl Hrdlicka, Doug Gerash
Director of Photography: Jeff Lambert
Animation:

Specifications

Genre:
Subjects: ,
Country:
Language:
Year:
Runtime: 8 min
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