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All Souls’ Day

A dark comedy that delves into professional and personal betrayal.
4/5

Review

Masha Egieva’s short dark comedy film takes viewers on a satirical journey into the dystopian future of Britain, where Kathleen Ray shines as Claire, a civil servant burdened with the task of processing applications for legal murder. The narrative revolves around a gripping predicament when Claire – unaware – receives an application from her own son, portrayed brilliantly by Alasdair Linn. Jem Hawkes adds an extra layer of intrigue as Claire’s colleague, creating a dynamic that fuels the film’s dark underbelly.

The film’s dark comedy elements and sharp wit give it a distinctive and compelling tone. Egieva skillfully portrays a society where the absurdity of legal murder is normalized, thus highlighting the moral gray areas and challenging the ethics of such a system. The film’s exploration of betrayal adds depth to the narrative, forcing the audience to confront uncomfortable truths about our own capacity for deception and the limits of familial loyalty.

Although the film sets up its intriguing premise well, the closing credits leave the viewer wanting more. While this may disappoint some, it also speaks to the compelling nature of the story and the desire for further exploration within this thought-provoking world.

The acting in the film is commendable, with Kathleen Ray delivering a strong performance throughout. Alasdair Linn impresses as Claire’s son, capturing the emotional complexity of someone desperately seeking a shocking solution to their problems. Jem Hawkes also contributes to the film’s success, adding layers of intrigue and serving as a catalyst for tension.

Masha Egieva’s short dark comedy film is a witty and thought-provoking exploration of timely themes. With its clever script, impressive performances, and exploration of betrayal, the film entertains while challenging viewers to reflect on the shades of morality in our own world. Although it may leave audiences desiring more by the end, it successfully leaves a lasting impression and reinforces the power of storytelling to push boundaries and provoke meaningful discussions.

Brief Synopsis

Set in the UK in the near future, citizens can submit an application to a governmental body, asking for permission to murder someone. Our protagonist writes one such application to murder his mother, unaware that she herself is on the applications committee.
All Souls Day

Spotlight

No artists for this title have been featured on Spotlight.

Credits

Director(s): Masha Egieva
Writer(s): Masha Egieva
Cast: Alasdair Linn, Erik Alstad, Jem Hawkes, Kathleen Ray, Marlon Williams
Producer(s): Raphaël Duhamel
Director of Photography: Evgeny Sinelnikov
Animation (if applicable):

Specifications

Genre: ,
Country:
Language:
Year:
Runtime: 8 min

Recommended

Recommended

All Souls’ Day

A dark comedy that delves into professional and personal betrayal.
4/5

Review

Masha Egieva’s short dark comedy film takes viewers on a satirical journey into the dystopian future of Britain, where Kathleen Ray shines as Claire, a civil servant burdened with the task of processing applications for legal murder. The narrative revolves around a gripping predicament when Claire – unaware – receives an application from her own son, portrayed brilliantly by Alasdair Linn. Jem Hawkes adds an extra layer of intrigue as Claire’s colleague, creating a dynamic that fuels the film’s dark underbelly.

The film’s dark comedy elements and sharp wit give it a distinctive and compelling tone. Egieva skillfully portrays a society where the absurdity of legal murder is normalized, thus highlighting the moral gray areas and challenging the ethics of such a system. The film’s exploration of betrayal adds depth to the narrative, forcing the audience to confront uncomfortable truths about our own capacity for deception and the limits of familial loyalty.

Although the film sets up its intriguing premise well, the closing credits leave the viewer wanting more. While this may disappoint some, it also speaks to the compelling nature of the story and the desire for further exploration within this thought-provoking world.

The acting in the film is commendable, with Kathleen Ray delivering a strong performance throughout. Alasdair Linn impresses as Claire’s son, capturing the emotional complexity of someone desperately seeking a shocking solution to their problems. Jem Hawkes also contributes to the film’s success, adding layers of intrigue and serving as a catalyst for tension.

Masha Egieva’s short dark comedy film is a witty and thought-provoking exploration of timely themes. With its clever script, impressive performances, and exploration of betrayal, the film entertains while challenging viewers to reflect on the shades of morality in our own world. Although it may leave audiences desiring more by the end, it successfully leaves a lasting impression and reinforces the power of storytelling to push boundaries and provoke meaningful discussions.

Spotlight

No artists for this title have been featured on Spotlight.

Brief Synopsis

Set in the UK in the near future, citizens can submit an application to a governmental body, asking for permission to murder someone. Our protagonist writes one such application to murder his mother, unaware that she herself is on the applications committee.
All Souls Day

Credits

Director(s): Masha Egieva
Writer(s): Masha Egieva
Cast: Alasdair Linn, Erik Alstad, Jem Hawkes, Kathleen Ray, Marlon Williams
Producer(s): Raphaël Duhamel
Director of Photography: Evgeny Sinelnikov
Animation:

Specifcations

Genre: ,
Country:
Language:
Year:
Runtime: 8 min
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